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Lawn Grass Seed



Perhaps no other landscaping feature is as cherished as lawn – and for good reason. Life happens on the lawn. It’s where backyard ballgames are played, walking is done barefoot, and children and pets run free. When used responsibly, lawn grass provides the central open space that establishes a focal point and creates organization in the design. Turfgrass is also the premier surface for many of our favorite sports with most athletes preferring real grass over synthetic surfaces. And let’s not forget the important role grass plays around our parks, schools, and other public spaces.

Top Sellers: Best Lawn Grass Seed Products

Kentucky Bluegrass Seed: Blue Ribbon Blend

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When only the best will do, our Blue Ribbon Blend is the clear choice. Only top-rated varieties make it into this blend of Kentucky bluegrass and perennial ryegrass, creating a genetically superior cool-season turf with velvety texture, deep green color, and unmatched traffic tolerance. Ideal for high quality lawns and sports fields in the northern half of the United States.

Triple-Play Tall Fescue Seed Blend

DETAILS

When it comes to cool-season lawns it’s hard to beat the adaptability and overall toughness of turf-type tall fescue. Its tolerance of heat, shade, traffic, and less than ideal soil conditions is legendary. Our Triple-Play Tall Fescue Blend shines in areas where other cool-season grasses struggle, especially in the transitional climates of the United States.

Perennial Ryegrass Seed Blend

DETAILS

Thanks to its quick germination, our Perennial Ryegrass Blend is the fastest way to a quality cool-season lawn in the northern half of the United States. In the southern half it can be used to overseed warm-season grasses in the autumn, creating a temporary wintertime lawn. Use wherever an attractive, traffic-tolerant turfgrass is needed ASAP.

Bermudagrass Seed Blend

DETAILS

Bermudagrass has long been the standard by which all other warm-season grasses are judged, and for good reason. Our Bermudagrass Seed Blend creates a high-quality lawn or sports turf that can handle the intense heat of the south while retaining its rich green color and dense growth habit. Perfect for home lawns, public spaces, and sports fields.

Zoysia Grass Seed

DETAILS

When it comes to turfgrass for the southern half of the United States, zoysia grass delivers a luxurious alternative to other commonly used warm-season grasses. We’re currently using ‘Compadre’, a premium seeded zoysia variety with improved texture, color, and growth habit. This variety also has a longer lasting green color into the fall and an earlier spring green-up than other varieties.

Bahia Grass Seed Blend

DETAILS

Primarily used in the southeastern region of the United States, bahia grass is a great fit for soils too poor to support other warm-season grasses. Its ability to thrive under low-input management practices makes it a smart choice for low-maintenance lawns, roadsides, and utility areas where irrigation is not available.

Grass Seeds by Region

Southwest Transitional Southwest Desert Intermountain West Pacific Northwest Pacific Southwest Great Plains Southwest Steppe Great Lakes/New England Great Lakes/New England Great Lakes/New England Midwest/Mid-Atlantic South Atlantic Transitional Southern Subtropics Southern Subtropics Southeast Transitional Florida Tropics

Click on a map region to know more


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Seed is by far the smartest way to establish a lawn, but not all seed is created equal. Anybody can purchase lawn seed at their local big-box store, but do you think that’s where golf course superintendents or high-end property managers go for their projects? Not a chance. A careful look at the seed tags of these products will reveal their true nature – high levels of inert matter, filler species, and mediocre varieties.

At Nature’s Seed, we only stock turf varieties that have been top-rated by the National Turfgrass Evaluation Program (NTEP). These elite varieties have been bred for superior genetic traits such as color, density, drought tolerance, and disease and pest resistant. You won’t find these varieties at big-box stores. Once we’ve acquired the best seed possible we submit it to rigorous quality controls including custom cleaning, purity, and viability testing performed by independent seed laboratories. And unlike other seed companies, we sell all our grass seed in PLS (pure live seed). This means you get the exact amount of viable seed that you order, every time.

About our Lawn Grass Seed

How to Plant Lawn Seeds

Step 1 – Prepare the area by killing off and/or removing the old lawn or existing vegetation. This can be accomplished using a tiller, sod cutter, or with a glyphosate herbicide. If you use a tiller or sod cutter, break up any soil clumps and rake the area smooth. If you use glyphosate, wait 2-3 weeks and then remove the dead vegetation. Scalping the area with a string trimmer or lawnmower on the lowest setting does this nicely. Follow this up with a vigorous raking to loosen and smooth out the soil.

Step 2 – Sow the seed using a seed spreader. Hand sowing can work for smaller areas, but larger areas should be planted with a mechanical spreader. Follow the spreader manufacture’s recommended settings for the type of seed you’re using. Most manufactures list their settings on their websites.

Step 3 – After sowing the seed work it into the soil by raking lightly or by pressing it into the soil using a lawn roller.

Step 4 – In arid climates, apply a thin layer of mulch to help the soil retain moisture (optional).

Step 5 – Keep the soil constantly moist, but not soaked, until the new grass is two inches tall. This is usually accomplished by watering 2-3 times a day for 5-10 minutes at a time.


Lawn Grass Seeders

There are several different makes and models of seed spreaders:

Hand-held Broadcast Spreaders – These are some of the most common and least expensive types of spreaders available. The spreader is held with one hand while the other hand cranks on a handle, flinging the seed over a distance as you walk across an area. These spreaders work great for smaller lawns but aren’t practical for large lawns or sports fields. Flow rate accuracy and quality can also be questionable on some models.

Tow Behind/Push Broadcast Spreader – These types of spreaders fling seed just like the hand-held versions, but are wheeled across the ground instead of carried and are much more efficient for large areas. However, what you make up for in speed and efficiency you lose in precision. Best used for large open areas.

Drop Spreaders – Drop spreaders are also wheeled and pushed/towed along the ground, but instead of flinging seed over a distance they “drop” seed from the bottom of the spreader in a very precise, controlled manner. Drop spreaders are an excellent choice for seeding irregularly shaped lawns and keeping seed out of flower beds, sidewalks, etc. but are more time-consuming than broadcast spreaders.

Slit Seeders – Slit seeders are engine-powered machines that cut small groves into the soil and place the seed directly into these slits all in one pass. They offer unmatched efficiency, accuracy, and seed-to-soil contact and produce some of the best results, but are tricky in tight areas. Used extensively by professionals and can also be rented by homeowners.


Type of Grass Seed or Grass Seed Types

Lawn grass can be classified into two main types, cool-season and warm-season. As you might have guessed, cool-season grasses perform better in the northern half of the United States while warm-season grasses are better adapted to the southern half. There are some species that can overlap these regions, but this rule-of-thumb is a good guideline. The most popular cool-season lawn grasses include Kentucky bluegrass, perennial ryegrass, and the fescues while some of the most popular warm-season grasses include bermudagrass, zoysiagrass, buffalograss and bahia. What about the transitional zone where the northern half of the country meets the southern half? In these areas, both cool and warm-season types can be used although we usually recommend our Triple-Play tall fescue blend.


When to Seed Lawn

First determine what type of grass species you’ll be using (cool-season type or warm-season type) based on your region and climate. Generally, cool-season types perform best in the northern half of the United States while warm-season types do well in the southern half. After you’ve determined if you’ll be using cool-season or warm-season species you’re ready to pick your planting date. Ideally, cool-season grasses should be planted in the spring or fall when your average high temperatures are in the 60-75 degree range, and warm-season grasses should be planted in the spring or early summer when your average high temperatures are in the 80+ degree range.


Additional Lawn Grass Seed FAQs

How long does it take for grass seed to grow & germinate?

Different grass species take different amounts of time to germinate (sprout). Here’s the most common lawn grasses listed from quickest to slowest. Keep in mind that these times are for seeds planted under ideal conditions – temperature, moisture levels, etc. If planted under less-than ideal conditions these times could be longer.

Perennial Ryegrass: 5-10 days

Fine Fescue: 7-12 days

Tall Fescue: 7-12 days

Buffalograss: 7-14 days

Zoysia Grass: 7-21 days

Bahia Grass: 10-14 days

Bermudagrass: 10-30 days

Kentucky Bluegrass: 14-30 days


How long is grass seed good for?

When stored in a cool, dry place and away from all temperature extremes, grass seed should last between 10-18 months from the testing date without a significant decrease in the germination rate. After this time the seed can still be used, but each year after that will see the germination rate drop. Most sources report a 10-20% decrease for every year grass seed is stored.

How much grass seed per acre?

Nature’s Seed sells turfgrass blends by the coverage area. These sizes range from 500 sq. ft. to 5000 sq. ft. and are based on our recommended seeding rates for each species. However, we know lawns come it larger sizes especially if you’re planting a park or sports field. For areas over 10,000 sq. ft. in size, please contact us for the best prices possible.

Here’s a handy guide for planting grass seed by the acre based on our recommended seeding rates for each of our turf blends.

Blue Ribbon Kentucky Bluegrass Blend: 218 lbs./acre

Velvet Blue Blend: 131 lbs./acre

Northeast Seed Blend: 131 lbs./acre

Northwest Seed Blend: 349 lbs./acre

Sun & Shade Blend: 262 lbs./acre

Perennial Ryegrass Blend: 436 lbs./acre

Fine Fescue Seed Blend: 349 lbs./acre

Triple-Play Tall Fescue Blend: 523 lbs./acre

Low Maintenance Seed Blend: 262 lbs./acre

Bahia Grass Seed Blend: 218 lbs./acre

Bermudagrass Seed Blend: 175 lbs./acre

Buffalograss Seed Blend: 131 lbs./acre

Zoysia Grass Seed Blend: 88 lbs./acre


How often to water grass seed?

When your lawn is just starting out you should keep the area constantly moist, but not soaked, until the new grass is two inches tall. This is usually accomplished by watering 2-3 times a day for 5-10 minutes at a time. After this, begin cutting back until you’re watering every other day. After a few weeks of this, cut back to three times a week. Once your lawn is fully established you can follow a more permanent schedule but remember infrequent, deep watering is better for your lawn than frequent, shallow watering. Watering every day not only encourages weed growth, it can also lead to a shallow root system since the roots have no reason to grow deeply to find moisture. This makes the grass more susceptible to drought stress if water suddenly becomes unavailable, like when water restrictions are put in place or natural precipitation fails to fall. Shallow roots are also more prone to pest problems, traffic damage, and diseases. Instead, water deeply enough to saturate the soil to a depth of 6-8 inches. Do this once or twice a week max. To find out if you’re watering deep enough, grab a shovel and start watering you lawn. Dig up a small section of your lawn every 15 minutes to find out how long it takes for water to seep 6-8 inches down. Once you know how long it takes, set your sprinkler system to water for that duration every time.


How to best plant grass seed in the spring?

While fall planting is the ideal time for cool-season turfgrasses such as Kentucky bluegrass, perennial ryegrass and fescue, springtime can be very successful too. For warm-season grasses like bermudagrass, buffalograss, zoysia grass and bahia, late spring is the best time.

Step 1 – Prepare the area by killing off and/or removing the old lawn or existing vegetation. This can be accomplished using a tiller, sod cutter, or with a glyphosate herbicide. If you use a tiller or sod cutter, break up any soil clumps and rake the area smooth. If you use glyphosate, wait 2-3 weeks and then remove the dead vegetation. Scalping the area with a string trimmer or lawnmower on the lowest setting does this nicely. Follow this up with a vigorous raking to loosen and smooth out the soil.

Step 2 – Sow the seed using a seed spreader. Hand sowing can work for smaller areas, but larger areas should be planted with a mechanical spreader. Follow the spreader manufacture’s recommended settings for the type of seed you’re using. Most manufactures list their settings on their websites.

Step 3 – After sowing the seed work it into the soil by raking lightly or by pressing it into the soil using a lawn roller.

Step 4 – In arid climates, apply a thin layer of mulch to help the soil retain moisture (optional).

Step 5 – Keep the soil constantly moist, but not soaked, until the new grass is two inches tall. This is usually accomplished by watering 2-3 times a day for 5-10 minutes at a time.


How to plant grass seed on existing lawn?

Planting into existing grass, also known as overseeding, is one of the best ways to rejuvenate an existing lawn. Not only does overseeding help bare and thin areas fill in, it also introduces newer turfgrass varieties into older lawns. These newer varieties bring with them added resistance to pests and diseases, and improve the overall quality of the lawn. Overseeding can be accomplished in three steps:

  1. Prepare the area by mowing your lawn shorter than usual and removing the clippings. This is important for achieving adequate seed-to-soil contact. For even better results, consider having your lawn core-aerated prior to overseeding.

  1. Sow the seed using a spreader. For overseeding purposes you only need to use half the recommended seeding rate. For example, if the seeding rate was 5 lbs. /1000 sq. ft. for establishing a new lawn, the seeding rate for overseeding an existing lawn would be 2.5 lbs. /1000 sq. ft.

  1. Keep the area constantly moist, but not soaked, while the new seed germinates. Continue this until the new grass reaches the height of your existing grass. Continue to mow as needed but try to limit the traffic on your lawn during this time.


How to plant grass seed on hard dirt?

Trying to plant grass seed on hard, compacted soil is challenging. Whatever you do, don’t bring in topsoil and spread it over the hard soil. While it may look like the problem is solved and your grass will even germinate and start to establish, that compacted layer will play havoc with the drainage, root development, and overall vigor of your grass later. However, if you can bring in enough new soil to bury the compacted soil at least 2-3 feet deep than this idea can work, but that much soil over a large area is usually not practical.

The best solution is to incorporate organic matter into the compacted soil at a depth of at least 6 inches, deeper if possible. Organic matter can include compost, lawn clippings, shredded leaves, aged manure, etc. Tilling is often the only way to incorporate this matter into the soil. Make sure the soil isn’t wet or it could do more harm than good. However, a slightly moist soil will make for easier tilling than bone dry soil will. In the future having the area core-aerated yearly will help avoid more compaction.


How to spread grass seed evenly?

The best way to sow grass seed, and the way we strongly recommend, is with a mechanical spreader. These spreaders come in many varieties but all function the same basic way. By adjusting the distribution rate these device help to ensure a uniform, consistent spread. This consistency makes for a more efficient use of grass seed and eliminates the patchiness often resulting from hand spreading. Here is a closer look at the different types of mechanical spreaders on the market:

Hand-held Broadcast Spreaders – These are some of the most common and least expensive types of spreaders available. The spreader is held with one hand while the other hand cranks on a handle, flinging the seed over a distance as you walk across an area. These spreaders work great for smaller lawns but aren’t practical for large lawns or sports fields. Flow rate accuracy and quality can also be questionable on some models.

Tow Behind/Push Broadcast Spreader – These types of spreaders fling seed just like the hand-held versions, but are wheeled across the ground instead of carried and are much more efficient for large areas. However, what you make up for in speed and efficiency you lose in precision. Best used for large open areas.

Drop Spreaders – Drop spreaders are also wheeled and pushed/towed along the ground, but instead of flinging seed over a distance they “drop” seed from the bottom of the spreader in a very precise, controlled manner. Drop spreaders are an excellent choice for seeding irregularly shaped lawns and keeping seed out of flower beds, sidewalks, etc. but are more time-consuming than broadcast spreaders.

Slit Seeders – Slit seeders are engine-powered machines that cut small groves into the soil and place the seed directly into these slits all in one pass. They offer unmatched efficiency, accuracy, and seed-to-soil contact and produce some of the best results, but are tricky in tight areas. Used extensively by professionals and can also be rented by homeowners.


What is the best grass seed for shade?

Most grasses prefer full-sun (8+ hours of sunlight a day), and some grasses can handle part-sun (4-6 hours of sunlight a day). But for areas that receive 2-4 hours a day, fine fescue is the best choice for northern climates. Unfortunately, if you have an area that receives less than 2 hours of sunlight a day you might need to consider a different type of groundcover.

For shady areas in the southern half of the United States your options are very limited. Warm-season grasses perform best in these southern areas, but warm-season grasses are also known for being intolerant of shade. Some varieties of zoysia can tolerant part-sun conditions, but the most shade-tolerant warm-season grass is St. Augustine (not available in seed form). St. Augustine grass has some drawbacks however, so be sure to do your homework before considering this type of lawn.


What is the best way to plant grass seed in the fall?

Late summer and early fall is the prime time for planting cool-season grasses like Kentucky bluegrass, perennial ryegrass, and fescue. Soil temperatures are warm and nights are cool which encourages quick germination and rabid establishment. Fall also happens to be the beginning of the wetter season throughout much of the United States, and soil moisture levels are near perfect. However, fall is not a good time for planting warm-season grasses like bermudagrass, buffalograss, zoysia grass, or bahia. Wait until late spring for these types of grasses.

Step 1 – Prepare the area by killing off and/or removing the old lawn or existing vegetation. This can be accomplished using a tiller, sod cutter, or with a glyphosate herbicide. If you use a tiller or sod cutter, break up any soil clumps and rake the area smooth. If you use glyphosate, wait 2-3 weeks and then remove the dead vegetation. Scalping the area with a string trimmer or lawnmower on the lowest setting does this nicely. Follow this up with a vigorous raking to loosen and smooth out the soil.

Step 2 – Sow the seed using a seed spreader. Hand sowing can work for smaller areas, but larger areas should be planted with a mechanical spreader. Follow the spreader manufacture’s recommended settings for the type of seed you’re using. Most manufactures list their settings on their websites.

Step 3 – After sowing the seed work it into the soil by raking lightly or by pressing it into the soil using a lawn roller.

Step 4 – In arid climates, apply a thin layer of mulch to help the soil retain moisture (optional).

Step 5 – Keep the soil constantly moist, but not soaked, until the new grass is two inches tall. This is usually accomplished by watering 2-3 times a day for 5-10 minutes at a time.


What to cover grass seed with?

Covering an area with mulch after seeding can be beneficial when establishing a new lawn. While it’s not a requirement it can help the soil retain moisture. This is especially helpful in dry, arid parts of the country. There are many different types of mulches available ranging from peat moss, straw, compost, recycled paper, etc. We strongly recommend against peat moss as its use contributes to wetland destruction. Straw is a cheap option, but make sure it comes from a weed-free source or else you could introduce weed seeds into your new lawn. Spreading one 80 lb. bale per 1000 square feet is adequate. The best option is our professional-grade Seed Aide Cover Grow – water retaining seed starting mulch. This mulch combines post-consumer recycled paper, recycled clean whole-wood mulch, organic tackifier, and bio-stimulant for superior seed establishment.


Where does grass come from?

Nature’s Seed uses an extensive network of grass seed producers from around the country, but the majority of the cool-season grass seeds we use were grown and harvested in the Pacific Northwest. Oregon is the largest supplier of cool-season grass seeds in the country and is grown and harvested by professional farmers. Here at Nature’s Seed, we select and stock only the best grass varieties based on data gathered by the National Turfgrass Evaluation Program (NTEP).






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