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Introducing Our New Seed Specialist: Marinna

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Hello!

My name is Marinna. I am new to Nature's Seed as a Seed Specialist. I am also an online student currently working on my Crop & Soil Science BS at Oregon State University with a concentration in agronomy and a minor in Environmental Science. My passions include seeds, soil, and plants. I have an extensive seed collection at home that I am quite proud of. In my spare time, I start crops from seed, read murder mysteries, watch horror films, do a lot of homework, and spend time in the backyard with my two dogs (North and Lady) and my partner.

I love being outside and learning more about plant species and how we can create harmonious bonds within our ecosystems. I am interested in regenerative agriculture, ecological and soil restoration, native and wildfire-resistant plants, and wetland restoration. I am new to Utah, since 2021. I am excited to learn more about native plant species and to pass on my knowledge.

I have included some of my favorite native wildflowers and grasses below. Native plants are so important to the overall health, stability, and functioning of ecosystems: contributing to the nutrient cycle, soil stabilization, water filtration, and the regulation of local microclimates. They support biodiversity and provide numerous ecological, cultural, and economic benefits. Native plants represent the genetic diversity of a region and can contain unique traits and adaptations that are crucial for conservation efforts and the future of plant breeding. By protecting native plant species, we can preserve genetic resources and ensure the resiliency and adaptability of plant populations in the face of environmental changes. Additionally, native plants provide deep root systems that improve soil structure, prevent erosion, and reduce agricultural runoff of excess nutrients and pollutants into our waterways.

 

Splitleaf Indian Paintbrush

AKA “Rosy Paintbrush” and “Alpine Paintbrush”. Thrives in higher elevations and is extremely drought tolerant. Requires a host plant for survival.

 

Splitleaf Indian Paintbrush

Native: Intermountain West

Scientific Name: Castilleja rhexiifolia

Life Form: Perennial

Height: 8”-32”

Germination Rate: Slow

Blooms: June-August

 

Showy Milkweed

Prefers well-drained soils, extremely drought tolerant, and highly attractive to pollinators of all kinds. Can be found along roadsides, ditch banks, and open meadows. Is a host plant to the Monarch Butterfly.

 

Showy Milkweed

Native: Western United States

Scientific Name: Asclepias speciosa

Life Form: Perennial

Height: 12”-72”

Germination Rate: Slow

Blooms: May-September

 

Sand Dropseed

Native bunchgrass that prefers sandy, well-drained soils. Is drought tolerant, very valuable for erosion control in sandy areas, wildfire resistant, provides forage for livestock and wildlife, and can be grown without irrigation in areas that receive 8 inches of annual precipitation.

Sand Dropseed

 

Native: Semi-Desert areas of the Intermountain West

Scientific Name: Sporobolus cryptandrus

Life Form: Warm-Season Perennial

Height: 1’-3’

Germination Rate: Slow

Seeding Rate: 2lbs./Acre

©Matt Lavin via Flickr

Bluebunch Wheatgrass

Native bunchgrass is an excellent component of erosion control and reclamation projects. Is long-lived and palatable forage for livestock and wildlife, drought-tolerant, wildfire resistant, adaptable to most soils, and can be grown without irrigation in areas that receive 8-10 inches of annual precipitation.

Bluebunch Wheatgrass

 

Native: Semi-Desert areas of the Intermountain West

Scientific Name: Pseudoroegneria spicata

Life Form: Cool-Season Perennial

Height: 1’-4’

Germination Rate: Normal

Seeding Rate: 10lbs./Acre

©Matt Lavin via Flickr

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