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Revegetating Scorched Land

Revegetating Scorched Land

Hello all!

In my previous blog post "How Does Land Recover After a Wildfire?” I discussed the common aftermath disasters of a wildfire, how to prevent a wildfire and how to keep the forest healthy. Like previously stated in my last two blogs, wildfires are actually vital for the health of a forest. That being said, they can also be detrimental. So, after the blaze, what is one of the best actions to take next? The answer to that question is as simple and complicated as this; revegetate. Revegetation is the process of replanting and rebuilding the soil of the disturbed land. That’s the simple part. The complicated part is what to plant, how much to plant, and where to plant it. The biggest mistake made when replanting mass areas is planting the wrong species (i.e. species that is not native to the land and could harm the ecosystem.)

 

For example, after the Montana wildfires, a seed blend such as the Intermountain West Erosion Control Blend would be beneficial for revegetation. For California, however, the Pacific Southwest Erosion Control Blend would be better. The differences between these two blends are:

 

Intermountain West Erosion Control Blend

This blend contains grasses and legumes that establish very quickly for the fastest results possible while at the same time knitting together the soil to prevent future erosion. This blend can also be used for livestock and wildlife forage.  
This blend produces a stand that will contain approximately:

  • 20% Mountain Brome
  • 20% Slender Wheatgrass
  • 20% Annual Ryegrass
  • 15% Perennial Ryegrass
  • 15% White Clover
  • 10% Quickguard (Sterile Triticale Hybrid)

These species are native to Montana and the Intermountain West.

 

Pacific Southwest Erosion Control Blend

This blend contains grasses that establish very quickly for the fastest results possible while at the same time knitting together the soil to prevent future erosion. This blend can also be used for livestock and wildlife forage.  
This blend produces a stand that will contain approximately:

  • 20% Slender Wheatgrass
  • 20% Sheep Fescue
  • 20% Annual Ryegrass
  • 15% Perennial Ryegrass
  • 15% Weeping Lovegrass
  • 10% Quickguard (Sterile Triticale Hybrid)

 

Although the two are similar, they do have different species that thrive better in different geographic areas. That is why researching the correct species to revegetate is so important. It isn’t just about the land, it is about what lives on the land and survives off of the ecosystem and plants that grow there. If the wrong species is planted in mass amounts, that could very well further pause the healing of the ecosystem.

Thanks for reading about wildfires with me the last few weeks, my next blog will be a DIY activity for parents wanting to do a fun project with their kids!

 

Let’s get to growing,

 

Corryn 

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